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© 1998-2019 Not Two Records

 Title:               Panoramic

 By:                  Jason Roebk / Tobias Delius

 Released in:   2013

 Format:          CD

 Catalog No:    MW 881-2

 Price :             12 EUR

Tracklist:

1. Cuttlefish [06:28]

2. On the Moon [09:02]

3. Which Goose [12:19]

4. G-Bug 2:47 [02:47]

5. Convolvulaceae [14:55]

6. Panther [02:05]

7. No Night [04:06]

8. Punkin [08:04]

 

Line-up:

 

Jason Roebke - double bass

Tobias Delius - tenor saxophone, clarinet

 

Review:

 

Balancing the timbres of a reed instrument with only a double bass’s four strings can be a sticky proposition – especially if the result is an all-improvised program. That hasn’t stopped many excellent musicians from attempting the feat though, including the multi-country duos featured here. During a series of instant compositions, the Panoramic duo sticks a little closer to more common Jazz motifs, while the Southville two are more involved with pure experimentation. Overall though, the latter create a more affecting program.

 

Recorded in Chicago, the eight tracks on Panoramic partner local bassist Jason Roebke, best-known for his work with the likes of cornetist Rob Mazurek, with Berlin-based clarinet and tenor saxophonist Tobias Delius, who has worked with the ICP Orchestra. Recorded in Bristol UK about a year later, Southville, Summer unites British bassist Dominic Lash, who has worked with the likes of saxophonists Evan Parker and John Butcher, with Madrid-born, London-resident Ricardo Tejero, who plays tenor saxophone, clarinet and whistles here and has worked with pianist Alexander Hawkins.

 

Although Lash and Tejero have been performing together regularly since 2007, the other CD appears to be one of Roebke’s and Delius’ infrequent meetings. That shouldn’t make a difference. In Jazz, brilliant disks often result from ad-hoc interactions. And, in fact, the two get things off to a hopeful start on “Cuttlefish” with rousing walking from the bassist and Delius coloring the theme as he curves around the other’s lines with flutter tonguing, snorts and slurs. Later on, especially on the extended tracks, Delius varies his cubist-like tone deconstruction on tenor saxophone with bedrock, breathy tones that bring to mind low-pitched masters like Coleman Hawkins and Ben Webster...

 

(Ken Waxman, Jazzword.com)