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© 1998-2019 Not Two Records

 Title:              Double Arc

 By:                 The Resonance Ensemble

 Released:       2015

 Format:          CD

 Catalog No:    MW 936-2

 Price :             12 EUR

Tracklist:
1. Arc One, section A (5:00)
2. Arc One, section B (4:44)
3. Arc One, section C (4:56)
4. Arc One, section D (2:59)
5. Arc One, section E (7:57)
6. Arc One, section F (2:06)
7. Arc One, section G (9:09)
8. Arc One, section H (6:05)
9. Arc Two, section A (2:46)
10. Arc Two, section B (4:52)
11. Arc Two, section C (2:31)
12. Arc Two, section D (4:46)
13. Arc Two, section E (2:10)
14. Arc Two, section F (3:19)

Reeds:
Ken Vandermark -baritone saxophone & Bb clarinet
Dave Rempis - alto & tenor saxophone
Mikokaj Trzaska- alto saxophone & bass clarinet
Waclaw Zimpel -Bb & alto clarinet
Brass:
Magnus Broo - trumpet
Per-Åke Holmlander - tuba
Steve Swell - trombone
Bass:
Mark Tokar
Drums:
Tim Daisy
Michael Zerang
Other:
Christof Kurzmann: lloopp

Recorded by Rafał Drewniany at the Manggha Culture Center, Krakow on November 24, 2013
Mixed by Bob Weston and Ken Vandermark at Chicago Mastering Service.  Mastered by Bob Weston at CMS.


WHAT CRITICS SAY:

 

“Double Arc” is the culmination of projects conceived by Ken Vandermark written for the large working group the Resonance Ensemble. An assemblage of influences as wide ranging as film scores, 50’s NYC composers, 60’s free jazz, 70’s African funk, etc., “Double Arc” is an epic work that is creatively stimulating, foot stomping, and at times maddening music. Comprised of Nikolaj Tzraska (alto sax and bass clarinet), Dave Rempis (alto & tenor sax), Mark Tokar (bass), Waclaw Zimpel (clarinet), Michael Zerang & Tim Daisy (drums), Steve Swell (trombone), Magnus Broo (trumpet), Per-Ake Holmander (tuba), the Resonance Ensemble is joined by Christof Kurzmiann (electronics/Lloopp), whose eclectic and diverse range of computer sounds enhance and perforate the ensemble’s already massive sound stage.There are essentially two tracks, subdivided into sections, Arc One and Arc Two, and each Arc is a journey, employing different styles, modes and moods. Vandermark in his liner notes writes that the composition was influenced by Witold Lutoslawski’s Cello Concerto, where it was shaped by using gestures, and not written notes. One does get a sense that “Double Arc” is formed by these gestures, as each section is noticeably different than the one before. For example, big band funk moves into stoic minimalism, then to free jazz, improvisation, free bop, and so forth.Given the diversity, it is to Vandermark’s credit that the music is as engaging as it is. At times I feel that his influences are a little too apparent (Don Ellis’ soundtrack music; the big band funk that to me is less Nigerian than George Russell large group funk), but I am nit picking, as I can hear and appreciate the nods to those sources. Everyone is in top form; the music is nothing less than spectacular. Arc Two is the stronger of the two tracks, not for just the Gil Evans like arrangements that begin the track, but the free form sonic blasts of Section C which lead right in to the searing hot funk mixed of Sections D, and the blistering free improv of Section F. “Double Arc” is the last album by this formative group, but they go out spectacularly.Highly recommended.

 

By Stefan Wood, freejazzblog.org