• Facebook B&W
  • Tumblr Social Icon
  • Twitter B&W
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • SoundCloud Social Icon

© 1998-2019 Not Two Records

 Title:               10.000 Leaves

 By:                  Wild Chamber Trio

 Released in:   2012

 Format:          CD

 Catalog No:    MW 880-2

 Price :             12 EUR

Tracklist:

1. Atomic Heart [07:28]

2. Shade Multiplication [03:07]

3. Fire Code [08:02]

4. Radiance [04:10]

5. 10.000 Leaves [09:43]

6. Kitty Hawk [09:53]

7. Remaining Words [09:30]

 

Line-up:

Gianni Mimmo - soprano sax

Elisabeth Harnik - piano

Clementine Gasser - 5-string cello

 

Review:

 

Slapped spiccato vibrations from Gasser’s 5-string cello, rolling keyboard swells, sharply voiced and arpeggiated from Harnik and squeaks, narrowed trills and percussive tongue slaps from Mimmo’s soprano saxophone predominate. With “Remaining Words” downsized, gentle and near melodious by its final bars, the CD’s most distinctive and characteristic pieces are the title track plus “Kitty Hawk”. So harsh and unyielding that it could have been put together by Italian Futurists, the latter combines key clipping and metronomic soundboard echoes with percussive slaps from the cello and a barnyard of extended techniques from the saxophonist, encompassing bitten-off notes, a harsh vibrato, lip growls and a point where the reed cries could be an infant’s demand for attention. Stretched multiphonic strings and pressurized reed tones serve as the climax.

 

As for “10,000 Leaves” the buzzy cello strokes, quivering piano runs and nearly vocalized peeping from the saxist unroll in close proximity, but never in tandem. Whether the reference is to leaves of a book or tree leaves is unclear. However part way through, a lyrical attempt does come from Mimmo, with string slides from Gasser and percussive and pan-tonal comping from Harnik creating an accompanying ostinato. Eventually as the cellist presses harder and harder against her strings and the saxophonist creates nasal multiphonics, the pianist’s percussive linkage draws all three into a final festive, near fantasia.

 

Ken Waxman, JazzWord.com